Hardwood, Vinyl and Tile, Oh My!

Posted by Julia Forneris | Thursday, April 28th

Hardwood, Vinyl and Tile, Oh My!

Floors. We take them for granted. They aren't as flashy as an accent wall or floor-to-ceiling windows, but they get us around. We may not always notice a great floor, but we sure do a scratched or worn one. A fresh, clean expanse of flooring sets the foundation for your home, and each room in it. Let's take a look at some of choices and trends available. 

Hardwood

  • Wood floors are a classic, but today's options are plentiful. Even if the floor is new to the home, people often want a distressed, lived-in appearance, which can lend a great deal of character. Aside from being environmentaly friendly, reclaimed wood is a popular choice. Wood from old barns or even demolished homes are given a second purpose, along with a much-desired look. The only consideration is whether this look will stand the test of time since the charm of it (namely, the inconsistency with each plank) could eventually be a drawback.
  • Bamboo is another option - strong, moisture-resistant and eco-friendly. Years back, the material was met with some pushback due to some wood shrinking, but those issue have since been resolved. Bamboo, along with cork, are available in a wide range of colors.

Vinyl

Vinyl today ain't your mama's vinyl. If the name conjures up black and white checkers or dated patterns, it's time to rediscover it. Today's vinyl is luxury vinyl (yes, that's a real term). Newer techonology lends a variety of textures: wood, stone, you name it. It's durable, affordable and not going away anytime soon.

Tile 

Tile's benefits are plentiful. It's strong, fairly easy to replace and easy to clean. So, really, the only thing new here is the incredibly diverse looks available. 

  • Wide tiles. Larger tiles means less grout and creates the appearance of an open room.
  • Wood look. Longer, rectangular ceramic tiles are crafted with the look of real wood, complete with the grain.
  • Stone: Natural and industrial textures abound, from porcelain tiles that look like brick, to tiles that look like cement. 

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